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Examples of stereotypes

Discussion in 'Assignments, Dissertations & Exams (Midwifery)' started by Bunny, Jul 16, 2008.

  1. Bunny

    Bunny Member

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    Hi ladies

    I'm doing a presentation on Cultural Competence later this year. It's quite a heavy going topic so I wanted to lighten the mood a little by talking about, and giving some examples of stereotypes we come across in midwifery. I'm sure I'm not the only one who've heard expressions like, "Asian women have a low pain threshold". :eek:

    I'm particularly keen to extend it beyond race and ethnicity, to other groups, such as subcultures and different ages. For instance, in light of another thread, how about, "obstetricians always have C-sections"? ;)

    Any suggestions you have would be gratefully appreciated. If anyone doesn't want to post please feel free to PM me. Thanks in advance! xxx
  2. Azalea

    Azalea Educational Moderator and RM Staff Member Plus! Member

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    One particular stereotype that I came across in my own experiences when I was pregnant with my own children was that all teenage pregnancies are unwanted/accidents/single mums. This really infuriated me as when I fell pregnant at 18 it was a very much wanted and planned pregnancy which both me and my hubby were ecstatic about. We made the decision to have our children young and 'live' later when they were older and could enjoy living our lives with us. People kept saying we wouldn't last and were even more shocked and horrified when I fell pregnant with our 2nd child when the 1st was 1yr old - this again was planned.

    We had seen both sides of the age debate - my parents being younger than most and his having more children pretty much at the same time as us! This prompted us to make an informed decision to have our family young, this was very much frowned upon by friends, family and health professionals. They assumed that we wouldn't cope and that we wouldn't stay together, we lost many friends who diagreed with our decisions but also have made many new friends through having our children. suffice to say we are very happy with our decision and have proved them all wrong - we are still very much together after 13yrs!
  3. Bunny

    Bunny Member

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    Thanks, potbella! And well done to you for proving the critics wrong! :clap:

    My mentor is a teenage specialist in the community and I've met a fair few women who are in the same boat as you and decided to have children early, and most of them were in loving stable relationships. It's also worth remembering that physiologically young women are in the best shape for having children!
  4. Azalea

    Azalea Educational Moderator and RM Staff Member Plus! Member

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    Exactly! After all going back 50yrs girls were married off and having families in their teens. I think that teens should be given more postive support, rather than just the assumption that they are silly girls who didn't know how to use contraception. Anyone can be a good/bad mum regardless of their age, it is all about whether they want to be and whether they have good positive support to enable them to be.

    On this subjectI am currently reading 'the light in the window' which is about a catholic home for unmarried mothers in the 1950's and it is both horrific and heartwarming seeing how the girls were treated because of the situation they found themselves in, yet they all fell in love with their babies when they were born.

    I would recommend this as a good read if you have the time as it shows this kind of sterotype well.
  5. TracyB

    TracyB Active Member

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    Well there are lots aren't there? Obviously the teenagers is a biggy, they get a raw deal from every angle it would seem.
    Also "older mums are so demanding"
    IVF mums "precious"
    Multips "she'll just spit it out"
    Sorry just giving examples, you realise these of course are not mine!!
    I think everyone has a right to know about whats going on obviously, its just that some ask more than others, as others do not want to/dare to, and as for the precious (sp) one, are all babies not ?? Regardless of how they were conceived through love/hate/IVF/passion etc... They are all special and we are there to ensure these special women and their babies are cared for safely, appropriately, ensuring tailored individualsed care. I mean who is normal these days? And who isn't stereotyped now? I am overweight, so I would scare the life out of obstetricians should I ever fall pregnant again, and my BMI isn't even that high!!
    Great topic though, you can really get your teeth into a topic like this can't you?
  6. elliesmummy

    elliesmummy New Member

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    I too was a teenage mum at 19 and I hate to say it but I was very patronised by some of the staff. My friend has just had her second and had her first at 18 and she said there was such a huge difference now she is 22, married and has her second child compared to the way she was treated 4 years ago at 18.:-(

    I am hoping to specialise in teenage pregnancies in a good few years hehe x x x
  7. fairydustsharon

    fairydustsharon Member

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    Hi

    I'm the other end of the scale as an "older mum" - I had my first at 35 and my 2nd at 37! Guess I must be the "demanding" mum then :laughing:But for me, that was the right age. I think we were scared of the responsibility to do it any earlier even though we both wanted a baby earlier (we were together 10 years before #1 arrived!) Plus the fear of giving birth I think partly put me off making the decision! We both did some travelling when we were younger too, which we wouldn't have been able to do with children. Also, my mum had a baby at 36 (I was 12 then), so maybe having a screaming baby in the house put me off? But i have worked with children as well, I was a nanny overseas for 2 years around the age of 21/22 & maybe that put me off too? I'm not saying they were all naughty children though - well, maybe not all the time anyway! :tt2:

    My friend had her 1st daughter at 24 and was told then that she was an "older" mum - so I guess that must make me ancient one then! lol! And I don't know about asian women having a low pain threshold - with my first I think my first word when i got to hospital was "epidural" :laughing: (but in my defence i had got to 7-8cms by that time!)

    But I agree, there are good & bad mums at every age. It depends on the individual person. I've heard of the teenage mum stereotype, but can't think of any more at the moment. Good luck with your presentation Bunny

    Sharon x
  8. Bunny

    Bunny Member

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    Thanks guys - some really good examples! It was a good mentor I had that made me think of this, and I must admit stereotypes predominate in so many aspects of midwifery. Some of them might be based on research evidence, but I think the vast majority are racist / ageist / offensive!

    Keep 'em coming!
  9. Josie

    Josie SMNET Co Founder Staff Member

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    I came across one which surprised me first time I heard it 'Teachers are a nightmare, they think if theyve read the book they know it all'. Ive heard that alot - its almost anti educated/well informed women in my view.

    Its the same definition for an 'NCT type' Ive heard that alot.
  10. Duel

    Duel Guest

    J I was gonna comment on the teacher thing.. Soooo many times I've heard, ''Ohhhh shes a teacher, have fun...''

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