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If you are a midwife, can you help your relatives give birth?

Discussion in 'General Midwifery Discussions' started by Sioned Mai Jones, Mar 30, 2012.

  1. Sioned Mai Jones

    Sioned Mai Jones New Member

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    I've just been accepted to university. My sister asked me a question that I don't know the answer to, which is can I help her give birth? I've looked everywhere on the internet and can't find an answer, can anyone answer this question? It's really bugging me now, because I wouldn't see why not you wouldn't be able to assist your own relatives during labour.
     
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  2. Butterfly

    Butterfly Guest

    You can- though there are certain procedures put in place so that you are covered by your trust- you baisically have to 'apply' as you would be on call for a friend/relative and potentially becoming in to a unit outside your normal working hours. Normally you are not covered to practise midwifery unless you are on an alloted shift and count as part of the staffing.

    You also need to inform the local supervisor of midwives in the area the woman is due to give birth- and seek advice and support from them.

    Personally, I think it's a bit of a minefield. The only people I'd really agree to attend in labour are my friends who are Midwives, as there's that mutual understanding of the physiology, the goings-on, and of when it might be appropriate to step back. How would you feel if she sustained a bad tear? The baby was unwell? She had a traumatic time? She will always associate you with that birth and it may not necessarily be positive. There's always that risk that it could cause irreparable damage to your relationship. Remember that whilst having a baby is predominantly a joyful experience, it also has the potential to be fraught with many other emotions too.
    In answer to your question, essentially yes, you can, if you go through the right channels, though it is not particularly encouraged within the current NHS maternity system.

    x
     
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    eandpsmum likes this.
  3. Penguin

    Penguin Well-Known Member

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    Agree with butterfly - you can do it, but many choose not to
     
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  4. Lil Miss Sunshine

    Lil Miss Sunshine Well-Known Member

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    My mother refused to be the catcher in my births but she was there as a support. I remember with my first particularly, people asked her if she would be the midwife at the birth and she just said she couldn't do it just in case and that it was too much for her to deal with that responsibility as i was her daughter having her grandchild.
     
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  5. iolaus

    iolaus RM and Head of Clinical Practice
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    I wouldn't do it - as Butterfly said, only for fellow midwives - I am doing it at the moment for a friend, she did the same for me last year - but a relative, I'd rather remain sane. I don't think I could keep that distance if something went wrong
     
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  6. Maj

    Maj Active Member

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    I don't think Midwives are allowed to deliver their grandchildren anymore. Might be wrong though. xx
     
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  7. iolaus

    iolaus RM and Head of Clinical Practice
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    they can, it's just not advised - I know one, not planning on caring for her daughter was only there as support, who was told 'there isn't anyone to look after her - you look after her or she's being transferred to another unit' - she delivered her grandson then handed in her notice - I delivered the next grandchild, with her there as support for her daughter - had a lovely thank you card off her
     
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  8. Maj

    Maj Active Member

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    Woweee! So if her mum hadn't been her birthing partner then she would her delivered on her own? :eek: x
     
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  9. Jelly Baby

    Jelly Baby Active Member

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    No that's not what was said, she would have been transferred out. Which is what would happen in any situation where a unit is too busy to care for anymore women in labour. If the grandmother to be then chose to stay and midwife her daughter then that was her choice. She didn t have to do it.
     
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  10. Maj

    Maj Active Member

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    Ahh...thanks for clearing that up for me. xx
     
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