1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Queen Anne's obstetric history (1665 - 1714)

Discussion in 'Historical Interest' started by iolaus, Aug 17, 2009.

  1. iolaus

    iolaus RM and Head of Clinical Practice Staff Member

    Messages:
    12,187
    Likes Received:
    3,193
    Status:
    Midwife
    Pretty grim reading, It's from 'Royal Confinements' which they believe was due to rhesus incompatibility - the reason we now give anti-D to prevent this from happening - the first birth wouldn't be affected, was likely caused by an abruption when she fell.
    [​IMG]

    1. 12th May 1684 Stillborn girl (following a fall from her horse)
    2. 2nd June 1685 Live girl (Mary) died of an infection before her second birthday on 8th February 1687
    3. 12th May 1686 Live girl (Anne Sophia) died of an infection 6 days before her elder sister - presumably the same infection
    4. January 1687 miscarriage
    5. 22nd October 1687 Stillborn boy (died a month prior to birth)
    6. 16th April 1688 miscarriage
    7. 24th July 1689 Live boy (William) had convulsions at 6 weeks old (following fluid discharge from the ear so suspected ear infection) and then developed minor hydrocephalus. Died aged 11 from Scarlet Fever on 29th July 1700. He is in the picture above - aged 5
    8. 14th October 1690 Live girl (Mary) two months premature, she only lived for 2 hours)
    9. 17th April 1692 Live boy (George) lived for a few minutes, no mention of prematurity
    10. 21 January 1694 Stillborn girl
    11. 18th February 1696 ?twins Stillborn boy at 7 months gestation and the other twin 2-3months gestation (possibly fetus papareous ?sp?)
    12. 20th September 1996 miscarriage
    13. 25th March 1697 Stillborn daughter (no mention of gestation but must have been premature unless the previous miscarriage was one of twins)
    14. December 1697 miscarriage
    15. 15th September 1698 Stillborn boy
    16. 25th January 1700 Stillborn boy
    And this was probably common then - so much for women to go through, we don't realise half the time just how lucky we are
  2. _Josie

    _Josie Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,669
    Likes Received:
    938
    Status:
    Interested in Midwifery
    Fantastic historical post :) thankyou. So sad tho :( x
  3. Fairydust

    Fairydust Active Member

    Messages:
    1,740
    Likes Received:
    2
    Status:
    Not Specified
    yes, we are so lucky. this is very sad x
  4. TheBurd

    TheBurd Member

    Messages:
    473
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Not Specified
    What a history! amazing to read about, thanks for posting x
  5. AutumnMaple

    AutumnMaple Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,790
    Likes Received:
    184
    Status:
    N/A
    How devastating for her. We are so lucky now.
    Thanks for posting x
  6. Nigella

    Nigella Active Member

    Messages:
    1,172
    Likes Received:
    16
    Status:
    Not Specified
    gosh i can't imagine being able to go through half of that. :(
  7. Red Ranger

    Red Ranger Member

    Messages:
    937
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Not Specified
    Thats so sad, it just shows how lucky we are in this day and age x
  8. xnelliex

    xnelliex Well-Known Member Plus! Member

    Messages:
    4,436
    Likes Received:
    296
    Status:
    Midwife
    Interesting to read but very sad too.
    Thanks for posting. x
  9. dextersmum

    dextersmum New Member

    Messages:
    78
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Not Specified
    facinating read, but such a sad hstory i dont know how woman coped in those days i certainly wouldnt have been able to go on with so many tragic losses poor woman :(
    thank you for sharing
  10. Spinel

    Spinel Member

    Messages:
    393
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Not Specified
    Wow, fascinating and tragic reading.

Share This Page